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  • How to use the Microsoft Debugging Tool to troubleshoot Stop Errors (Blue Screen) in windows

    • Dell Recommended Video - Dell has created an online tutorial on how to use the Windows Debugger tool to troubleshoot specific blue screen errors. 
      Click here to view the Windows Debugger tutorial! - NOTE: English Only 


      The Windows Debugger is one of the primary tools used by Microsoft software developers and support staff to analyze and resolve errors that result in memory dumps, and it's available for you. 

      The Windows Debugger is a powerful tool with many useful applications, but for this article, we are only interested in its ability to analyze memory dump files generated by blue screen errors to determine the cause of the error. 
      Before you can use the tool, keep in mind the following:
      • The Windows Debugger is not a native Windows tool. You must download and install the application (15 MB) from the Microsoft web site. Administrator access is required to install the tool.
      • The Debugger requires some minor customization before use.
      • The Debugger can take anywhere from 30 seconds to two minutes to fully analyze a memory dump.


      To use the tool, follow these steps:

      1      Download and install the Windows Debugger from the Microsoft Web Site .

      Note: 
       
      If you use Google to search for "windows debugger," the first link returned will be the Windows Debugger home page.
       







      2      Once installation completes click , click  All Programs, click  Debugging Tools for Windows, then click  WinDbg to open the debugger. 


      3      Configure the symbol path used by the debugger to turn addresses in the memory dump file into meaningful location names: expand the File menu, select Symbol File Path, type "SRV*c:\debug_symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols" in the dialog box then click OK.


      4      Open a minidump file: expand the File menu, select Open Crash Dump, select the desired dump file and click Open.

      Note: 
       
      The system usually stores minidump files in either: C:\WINNT\Minidump\ or C:\Windows\Minidump\. The files will be named miniMMDDYY-NN.dmp, where MM is the month, DD is the day, and YY is the year in which the dump file was created. NNis the sequence the dump files were created in if multiple dumps were generated on the same day (the first crash dump on a given day will be numbered 01, the second 02, etc.).
       







      5      The debugger will open the dump file and give a brief description of what caused the system to crash. (Figure 2)

      Note: 
       
      The first time you use the Debugger to open and dump file on a system, it will take a few minutes to download symbol information in the background before it returns any information.
       


      Figure 2: Windows Debugger 
       Suggested command for the Debugger's command line
       Stop code from the blue screen (1000007F is the same as 0x7F)
       What Windows thinks caused the crash (atapi.sys in this example, you'll sometimes see things like memory_corruption







      6      When it returns this preliminary analysis, the Debugger tells you how to dig deeper. Type "!analyze -v" in the command line (kd>) field at the bottom of the window and press the Enter key to have the WinDbg perform a detailed analysis of the file.

      Note: 
       
      The results will be lengthy, and you may have to scroll vertically within the Debugger's window to locate all the pertinent information.
       


      Figure 3: Analyze the Results
       A detailed explanation of the stop code (in the example, you can see that the kernel encountered an EXCEPTION_DOUBLE_FAULT (8), or an error while trying to process an error)


      Figure 4: Further Analysis of the Results
       The bug check code (notice in the example it includes the number 8, indicating the double fault)
       The number of times the system has crashed with this exact error (typically 1)
       The bucket in which Windows has categorized the crash
       The stack trace at the time the system crashed, with the most recently called procedure on top (you can see in the example the system crashed while processing a request from the IDE controller)


      Figure 5: Additional Analysis
       The name of the module the system was in when it crashed. On an actual system, the module name is a link you can click to receive some useful information about the module, who created it, how old it is, etc









    • View More: Dell How to use the Microsoft Debugging Tool to troubleshoot Stop Errors (Blue Screen) in windows
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  • Remote Desktop Connection: frequently asked questions

  • Windows Anytime Upgrade

    • No disks, no delays—and no leaving the house. With Windows Anytime Upgrade, you can upgrade to a more advanced edition ofWindows 7—say from Home Premium to Ultimate—in as little as 10 minutes. That way, you get to take advantage of extra features while keeping your current programs, files, and settings intact.

      In the past, upgrading Windows could be a bit of a hassle. InWindows 7, the software you need comes preinstalled. You can buy an upgrade key online or from an authorized retail store. Learn more.

      Windows Anytime Upgrade is only available for online purchase in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, France, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

      Find out about upgrading to Windows 7 from Windows Vista orWindows XP


    • View More: Installation and Upgrade Windows Anytime Upgrade
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  • Troubleshoot problems installing a service pack for Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2

  • stop programs that start running at startup

    • Question

      stop programs that start running at startup

      stop programs from running in windows 7 at startup....  cisco pita
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      Answer
      In the Search programs and files box, type msconfig and click on the msconfig icon that appears. When the System Configuaration window appears, click on the Startup tab.  Then uncheck those programs you wish not to start and click Apply.
      Carey Frisch
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    • View More: Performance and Maintenance stop programs that start running at startup
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  • Share a printer

    • Sharing a printer requires a few steps. First, on the computer that the printer is plugged in to, follow these steps.

      To turn on file and printer sharing

      1. Open Advanced sharing settings by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clickingControl Panel. In the search box, type network, click Network and Sharing Center, and then, in the left pane, click Change advanced sharing settings.

      2. Click the chevron Picture of the chevron icon to expand the current network profile.
      3. If printer sharing is off, under File and printer sharing, select Turn on file and printer sharing, and then click Save changesAdministrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      Now you need to share the printer itself.

      To share your printer

      1. Open Devices and Printers by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then, on the Start menu, clicking Devices and Printers.

      2. Right-click the printer you want to share, and then click Printer properties.

      3. Click the Sharing tab, and select the Share this printer check box.

      Other people on your network can now connect to this printer. All they need to do is add a network printer (your printer) to their computers.

      To add a network printer

      1. Open Devices and Printers by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then, on the Start menu, clicking Devices and Printers.

      2. Click Add a printer.

      3. Click Add a network, wireless, or Bluetooth printer, click the shared printer, clickNext, and follow the instructions on the screen.

      For more information about sharing, see File sharing essentials.

      To watch another video, see Picture of a Play button‌ Video: Sharing a printer at home.

    • View More: Hardware and drivers Share a printer
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  • Install a USB device

    • USB (universal serial bus) connections are typically used to plug devices such as mice, keyboards, scanners, printers, webcams, digital cameras, mobile phones, and external hard disks into your computer. You'll recognize a USB connection by the symbol usually displayed on the connector.

      Illustration of the USB connection symbolSymbol of the USB connection

      Many devices need to have a USB cable plugged into them before they can be plugged into a USB port on your computer. Other USB devices, such as older mice and keyboards, have a USB cable permanently attached to them. And some USB devices, such as USB flash drives, have an integrated USB connector that allows them to be plugged directly into a USB port on your computer without a cable.

      USB devices are among the easiest devices to connect to your computer. The first time you connect a device that plugs into a USB port, Windows automatically identifies the device and installs a driver for that device. Drivers allow your computer to communicate with hardware devices. Without a driver, a USB device that you connect to your computer—for example, a mouse or a webcam—won't work properly.

      Before installing a device

      Check the instructions that came with the device to see if you need to install a driver before connecting the device. Although Windows usually does this automatically when you connect a new device, some devices require that you install drivers manually. In those cases, the device manufacturer includes a software disc and instructions on installing the driver before plugging in the device.

      If your USB device came with software from the manufacturer, check to see if it's compatible with this version of Windows. If it's not compatible, or doesn't say which versions of Windows it's designed for, try plugging the device in first to see if Windowscan find a compatible driver.

      If the instructions that came with your device contradict the information in this topic, follow those instructions.

      Plugging in and turning on a device

      To install any USB device, just plug it in to your computer. Some USB devices have power switches you should turn on before connecting them. If your device uses a power cord, connect the device to a power source. Then, turn it on before connecting it.

      Next, decide which USB port to connect your device to. If your computer has USB ports on the front, consider using one of those if you plan to frequently connect and disconnect the device. (You can use any port the next time you plug in the device.)

      Illustration of a typical USB cable and portA typical USB cable and port

      Plug the device into the USB port. If Windows can find and install the device driver automatically, you'll be notified that the device is ready to use. Otherwise, you'll be prompted to insert a disc containing the driver.

      Picture of a notification message saying that a device has been installedWindows will notify you when it finishes successfully installing a device.

      After installation is complete, check the information that came with your device to see if you need to install any additional software.

      Occasionally, a USB device isn't recognized by Windows and doesn't come with a disc containing a driver. In that case, you can try to find a device driver online. Start by checking the website of the device manufacturer—you can often download drivers from the "Support" section of such sites. For more information, see Update a driver for hardware that isn't working properly.

      To watch a video, see Picture of a Play button‌ Video: Connect devices to your computer.
      Tips

      Tips

      • Make sure the device is getting enough power. If a device doesn't work properly when connected to a USB hub, try connecting it directly to one of your computer's USB ports. Some ports on a USB hub, monitor, or other device that's plugged into your computer might not provide enough power to support your device.

        Smaller devices, such as USB flash drives and mice—and devices with their own power cords, such as printers—typically work properly when connected to an unpowered USB hub. Some devices that use more power, such as USB-powered scanners and web cameras, require a hub that has its own power cord to function properly.

      • Make sure the device is plugged in to the correct USB port.Devices that transfer large amounts of information, such as external hard disks, scanners, and video cameras, function best when connected to high-speed USB 2.0 ports. Some older computers might include only USB 1.x ports, or a mix of USB 1.x and 2.0 ports. If your device requires a high-speed port to function properly, check the information that came with your computer to make sure that the port you're using supports USB 2.0. If your computer includes only USB 1.xports, you can add USB 2.0 ports by installing a USB 2.0 card inside your computer.

      Disconnecting a device

      Most USB devices can be removed and unplugged. When unplugging storage devices, such as USB flash drives, make sure that the computer has finished saving any information to the device before removing it. If the device has an activity light, wait for a few seconds after the light has finished flashing before unplugging it.

      If you see the Safely Remove Hardware icon Picture of the Safely Remove Hardware icon in the notification area on the right side of the taskbar, you can use this as an indication that devices have finished all operations in progress and are ready to be removed. Click the icon and you'll see a list of devices. Click the device that you want to remove. Windows will display a notification telling you it's safe to remove the device.
      Note

      Note

      You can also safely remove devices from the Computer folder. Click theStart button Picture of the Start button, click Computer, right-click the device you want to remove, and then click Eject.

    • View More: Hardware and drivers Install a USB device
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  • Install a printer

    • The most common way to install a printer is to connect it directly to your computer. This is known as a local printer.

      If your printer is a universal serial bus (USB) model, Windows should automatically detect it and begin installation when you plug it in.

      If you're installing a wireless printer that connects to your computer over a wireless network (Wi‑Fi), you can use the Add a device wizard to install the printer. For instructions, see Connect to Bluetooth and other wireless or network devices.

      If it's an older model that connects using the serial or parallel port, you might have to install it manually.

      To install (add) a local printer

      1. Open Devices and Printers by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then, on the Start menu, clicking Devices and Printers.

      2. Click Add a printer.

      3. In the Add Printer wizard, click Add a local printer.

      4. On the Choose a printer port page, make sure that the Use an existing portbutton and the recommended printer port are selected, and then click Next.

      5. On the Install the printer driver page, select the printer manufacturer and model, and then click Next.

        • If your printer isn't listed, click Windows Update, and then wait whileWindows checks for additional drivers.

        • If none are available and you have the installation CD, click Have Disk, and then browse to the folder where the printer driver is located. (For additional help, consult the printer manual.)

      6. Complete the additional steps in the wizard, and then click Finish.

      Tips

      Tips


    • View More: Hardware and drivers Install a printer
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  • What to do when a device isn't installed properly

    • When you connect a new device to your computer, Windows automatically tries to install it for you and will notify you if a driver for the device can't be found. There are several things you can try if this happens:

      Make sure your computer is connected to the Internet and automatic updating is turned on

      Your computer must be connected to the Internet for Windows to be able to search online for a device driver. To see if your computer is connected to the Internet, open your web browser and try accessing a website. If you're temporarily disconnected, such as when you're traveling with a laptop, wait until you're online again, and then try reinstalling your device.

      Windows can't check for the latest drivers unless automatic updating is turned on. Most people turn on automatic updating the first time they use Windows, but if you're not sure you did, you should check to make sure it's turned on. Be sure to select the option to include recommended updates, or Windows will install important updates only. Important updates provide significant benefits, such as improved security and reliability, but recommended updates might include drivers for some of your devices. For more information, see Turn automatic updating on or off and Automatically get recommended drivers and updates for your hardware.

      When you connect a new device to your computer, Windows automatically tries to install it for you and will notify you if a driver for the device can't be found. There are several things you can try if this happens:

      Make sure your computer is connected to the Internet and automatic updating is turned on

      Your computer must be connected to the Internet for Windows to be able to search online for a device driver. To see if your computer is connected to the Internet, open your web browser and try accessing a website. If you're temporarily disconnected, such as when you're traveling with a laptop, wait until you're online again, and then try reinstalling your device.

      Windows can't check for the latest drivers unless automatic updating is turned on. Most people turn on automatic updating the first time they use Windows, but if you're not sure you did, you should check to make sure it's turned on. Be sure to select the option to include recommended updates, or Windows will install important updates only. Important updates provide significant benefits, such as improved security and reliability, but recommended updates might include drivers for some of your devices. For more information, see Turn automatic updating on or off and Automatically get recommended drivers and updates for your hardware.

      Manually check for drivers using Windows Update

      If you didn't have automatic updating turned on, or you weren't connected to the Internet when you connected a new device to your computer, you should check to see if Windowscan now find a driver for your device. Even if your computer is always connected to the Internet, you should still check Windows Updates for optional updates if some of your hardware isn't working properly. Optional updates often contain new driver updates.Windows Update does not install optional updates automatically, but it will notify you when it finds some and let you choose whether to install them.

      To check Windows Update for drivers

      1. Open Windows Update by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button. In the search box, typeUpdate, and then, in the list of results, click Windows Update.

      2. In the left pane, click Check for updates, and then wait while Windows looks for the latest updates for your computer.

      3. If there are any available updates, click the link in the box under Windows Updateto see more information about each update. Each type of update might include drivers.

      4. On the Select the updates you want to install page, look for updates for your hardware devices, select the check box for each driver that you want to install, and then click OK. There might not be any driver updates available.

      5. On the Windows Update page, click Install updates Administrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation..

        Notes

        Notes

        • Windows Update tells you if an update is important, recommended, or optional. For more information, see Understanding Windows automatic updating.

        • Some updates require you to restart your computer.

        • Windows Update will tell you if the updates were successfully installed.

      Install software for the device

      If Windows Update can't find a driver for your device, go to the Windows 7 Compatibility Center website, which lists thousands of devices, and has direct links to driver downloads. Also, try checking the manufacturer's website for a driver or other software for the device. If your device came with a disc, that disc might contain software needed to make your device work properly, but first check the manufacturer's website for the latest software and drivers.

      If you don't find any new software or drivers for your device on the manufacturer's website, try inserting the disc that came with the device, and then follow the instructions for installing the software.

      Note

      Note

      Many drivers come with software that installs the driver for you (often called a self-installing package), but you might have to install some drivers manually as well. For more information, see Update a driver for hardware that isn't working properly.

      Manually add older hardware that doesn't support Plug and Play

      If you have an older piece of hardware or a device that doesn't support Plug and Play,Windows won't automatically recognize it when you connect the hardware or device to your computer. You can try to manually add it to your computer using the Add Hardware Wizard.

      Note

      Note

      The Add Hardware Wizard is recommended only for advanced users.

      Follow these steps:

      1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button. In the search box, type run, and then, in the list of results, click Run.
      2. In the Run dialog box, type hdwwiz, and then click OK.

      3. Follow the instructions in the wizard, and then click Next.

      Run the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter

      If your computer is having problems with a recently installed device or other hardware, try using the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter to fix the problem. It checks for common issues and makes sure that any new device or hardware attached to your computer was installed correctly.

      Open the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type troubleshooter, and then clickTroubleshooting. Under Hardware and Sound, click Configure a device.‌ Administrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      Note

      Note

      To make sure you have the most up-to-date troubleshooters from theWindows Online Troubleshooting Service, your computer should be connected to the Internet. For more information, see Troubleshooting in Windows.

      If your device still doesn't work properly after trying these suggestions, a driver might not be available for your device. In this case, try contacting the device manufacturer.

      >

    • View More: Hardware and drivers What to do when a device isn't installed properly
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  • Install, view, and manage your devices and printers

  • Install or remove a sound card

    • Most new desktop computers come with a built-in sound card that you can replace. If your computer doesn't have a sound card installed or you want to upgrade the sound playback or recording capabilities of your computer, you can install a sound card. If you're having sound problems on your computer, see Tips for fixing common sound problems.

      Notes

      Notes

      • The instructions here apply to desktop computers. Most laptops have built-in sound processing chips (also called sound processors) but not internal sound cards. You can upgrade the sound on a laptop by plugging an external audio device into a USB port or external card slot, but this is rarely done.

      • Sound processors can also be built into desktop computers. You can't remove them, but to upgrade your sound, you can usually install an internal sound card and turn off the sound processor.

      Before installing a sound card, check the information that came with it. The guidelines shown here are general, and the sound card documentation might contain important information specific to installing that card. Also, be sure to check the information that came with your computer to see if opening your computer affects the computer's warranty coverage.

      Before installing a sound card, you'll need the following:

      • The sound card you want to install

      • A Phillips screwdriver to open your computer, if needed

      • An empty PCI slot inside your computer, unless you plan to replace an existing sound card (in which case you can put the new card into that slot)

      If your sound card came with a CD, DVD, or other removable media, it might contain a driver for your sound card. Hold on to that until Windows has finished looking for and installing a driver. Windows does this automatically after you install the sound card in your computer and turn the computer back on. If Windows can't find a good driver for your sound card, then try installing the driver that came with the sound card. Software from the manufacturer might also include other programs for your sound card.

      Picture of the jacks for a typical sound cardMost sound cards have at least one line-out jack to connect speakers and a line-in jack to connect an audio input device.
      Show all

    • View More: Hardware and drivers Install or remove a sound card
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  • Install or remove a hard disk drive

    • Installing a new hard disk is one of the most common upgrade tasks. It’s an easy way to extend the life of a computer that is running out of storage space. When you install a new internal or external hard disk, you can boost your total disk space several times over because hard disks are much bigger today than just two or three years ago.

      External hard disks

      The simplest way to add more hard disk space is to plug in an external hard disk. If you add an external hard disk, it can't function as your primary hard disk where you installWindows, but you can use it as a secondary disk to store programs and files. Adding an external hard disk is a good way to create plenty of extra space to store digital photos, videos, music, and other files that require a large amount of disk space.

      To install an external hard disk, all you have to do is plug it into your computer and connect the power cord. Most of these hard disks plug into a USB port, but some plug into a Firewire (also known as IEEE 1394) or external Serial ATA (eSATA) port. For additional instructions, check the information that came with your external hard disk. You might also need to install any software that came with the hard disk.

      For more information, see Install a USB device.

      Illustration of a typical USB cable and portYou can install most external hard drives just by plugging them into a USB port.

      Internal hard disks

      Internal hard disks connect to your computer's motherboard using an IDE interface or SATA interface. Most new hard drives come with either an IDE or SATA connection cable, depending on the type of drive.

      Installing an internal hard disk takes a bit more work, especially if you plan to make the new disk your primary hard disk where you install Windows. To install an internal hard disk, you should be comfortable opening your computer case and connecting cables.

      Most desktop computers have room for at least two internal hard disks. Laptops have room for only one hard disk. If you are replacing the primary hard disk rather than adding a secondary disk, you'll have to install Windows after you connect the disk.

      Note

      Note

      Many internal hard disks contain jumper pins that you must set to designate a hard disk as a primary (master) disk where you installWindows or as a secondary (subordinate) disk where you store programs and files. These jumpers are small plastic sleeves that you must place on the correct metal jumper pins. For additional instructions, check the information that came with the internal hard disk.

      Show all

      Preparing to use a new hard disk

      If you've installed your new hard disk correctly, your computer should recognize it. When you turn on your computer, the basic input/output system (BIOS) should automatically detect the new hard disk.

      If you plan to use the new hard disk as the primary partition that contains Windows, then you'll have to install Windows on the disk before you can use your computer. You'll need a Windows 7 installation disc to do this. For more information, search Help and Support for "Installing and reinstalling Windows."

      If you plan to use the new hard disk as a secondary disk (one that does not containWindows), you should be able to see the new hard disk drive the next time you start your computer and log on to Windows. After Windows starts, click the Start button Picture of the Start button, clickComputer, and then look for your new drive. The letter assigned to the drive will depend on your computer’s configuration. If you don't see the new hard disk drive, try looking for it in Computer Management.
      1. Open Computer Management by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Security, clicking Administrative Tools, and then double-clicking Computer Management.‌ Administrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      2. In the left pane, under Storage, click Disk Management, and then look for the new drive.

      You'll probably have to format the hard disk before you can use it. For instructions, seeFormatting disks and drives: frequently asked questions. Follow these same instructions to format an old hard disk that contains data you want to erase.

      If your computer doesn't recognize the new hard disk, double-check the installation instructions that came with the hard disk. If you have additional questions, go to the manufacturer's website.

      Note

      Note

      You can divide a new hard disk into more than one partition. Each partition on the hard disk can be formatted and assigned a drive letter. For more information, see Managing hard disks: recommended links.


    • View More: Hardware and drivers Install or remove a hard disk drive
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  • What is System Restore?

    • System Restore helps you restore your computer's system files to an earlier point in time. It's a way to undo system changes to your computer without affecting your personal files, such as e‑mail, documents, or photos.

      Sometimes, the installation of a program or a driver can cause an unexpected change to your computer or cause Windows to behave unpredictably. Usually, uninstalling the program or driver corrects the problem. If uninstalling doesn't fix the problem, you can try restoring your computer's system to an earlier date when everything worked correctly.

      System Restore uses a feature called system protection to regularly create and save restore points on your computer. These restore points contain information about registry settings and other system information that Windows uses. You can also create restore points manually. For information about creating restore points, see Create a restore point.

      System image backups stored on hard disks can also be used for System Restore, just like the restore points created by system protection. Even though system image backups contain both your system files and personal data, your data files will not be affected by System Restore. For more information about system images, see What is a system image?

      System Restore isn't intended for backing up personal files, so it cannot help you recover a personal file that has been deleted or damaged. You should regularly back up your personal files and important data using a backup program. For more information about backing up personal files, see Back up your files.

      • Open System Restore by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button. In the search box, type System Restore, and then, in the list of results, click System Restore.‌ Administrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      For more information about system protection, see What is system protection?


    • View More: Performance and Maintenance What is System Restore?
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  • Getting started with media streaming

    • Like many people, you probably have a lot of music, video, and picture files in yourWindows Media Player Library. There might be times, however, when you want to enjoy your songs, videos, or pictures when you're not sitting at the computer. For example, you might want to listen to your music from another computer in your kitchen or view your pictures on a digital picture frame in your living room. Media streaming, called media sharing in earlier versions of Windows Media Player, makes these experiences possible.

      Set up the proper equipment

      To stream your media, you need the following hardware:

      • A wired or wireless private network.

      • Either another computer on your network or a device known as a digital media receiver (sometimes called a networked digital media player). Digital media receivers are hardware devices connected to your wired or wireless network that you can control using your computer—even if your computer is in another room.

      For more information about setting up devices on your network, see Add a device or computer to a network.

      Turn on streaming

      To turn on media streaming on your home network in Windows Media Player, do the following:

      1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs, and then click Windows Media Player.
        If the Player is currently open and you’re in Now Playing mode, click the Switch to Library button Picture of the Switch to Library button in the upper-right corner of the Player.
      2. Click Stream, and then click Turn on home media streaming.

        Turn on home media streaming won't be available on the Stream menu if streaming is already turned on.

      3. On the Media streaming options page, click Turn on media streamingAdministrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      4. Click OK.

      For more information about how to use media streaming, see Stream your media to devices and computers using Windows Media Player.

      Decide what media is streamed and who receives it

      You can choose what you want to stream and what devices on your network can receive streams. For example, you can choose not to stream music with explicit lyrics or pictures rated three stars or less. You can even create different rules for each computer or device that receives streams. For more information about choosing streaming settings, seeChange settings for streaming media in Windows Media Player.

      Picture of the media streaming options control panelMedia streaming options

      For information about maintaining your privacy and security when streaming your media, see Privacy and security when streaming your media: frequently asked questions.

      Play a variety of media

      You can stream nearly any digital media file in your Player Library, including protectedWindows Media files downloaded from online stores. To stream a file in your Player Library, the original file must be stored in one of the monitored folders in your Windowslibraries. For information about monitored folders, see Add items to the Windows Media Player Library.

      Note

      Note

      If you're using a digital media receiver, it might not support playback of all the file types your computer can stream. For example, your device might support playback of audio files but not video files or picture files. Also, your device might be able to play songs that you purchased from an online store but not songs that you've rented through a subscription service.

      Stream media to devices and other computers using Play To

      The Play To feature allows you to stream music, videos, and pictures to other computers and devices on your home network so the media can be enjoyed in different locations in your home. For example, you can select a playlist in Windows Media Player on a computer in your bedroom and then stream the songs to a home stereo system connected to your wireless network.

      Picture of the Play To dialog boxPlay To dialog box

      For more information about Play To, see Using the Play To feature to stream media.

      Access your home media over the Internet

      If you have two computers running Windows 7, you can use Windows Media Player to access your home media over the Internet using remote media streaming. For example, if you've allowed remote media streaming on both a laptop and a home media computer, then you can access your home computer's Player Library using your laptop and an Internet connection.

      Picture of the Internet Home Media Access dialog boxInternet Home Media Access dialog box

      For more information about remote media streaming, see Stream your media over the Internet using Windows Media Player.

      Note

      Note

      Remote media streaming isn't available on Windows 7 Starter andWindows 7 Home Basic.


    • View More: Pictures and music Getting started with media streaming
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  • Stream your media to devices and computers using Windows Media Player

    • If you have a home network, you can use Windows Media Player to stream media to computers and media devices in your home. For example, if you have a networked digital media receiver connected to your home stereo system, you can use Windows MediaPlayer to stream music, pictures, and videos from your computer to your stereo. This allows you to enjoy the contents of your Player Library anywhere in your home—even in rooms that don't have a computer.

      Picture of a Play button Watch a demo:‌ Windows 7 Play To demo.

      The following procedures explain how to get started. For an overview about streaming media, including information about device and network requirements, see Getting started with media streaming.

      Hide all

      To connect a device or another computer to your network

      Before you can stream media, you'll need to connect your digital media devices or other computers to your home network. Here's how:

      1. Connect an Ethernet cable from your device or other computer to your wired network, or set up your device or computer to join your wireless network.

        For help connecting a device or computer to your network, check the documentation that came with your device or computer.

      2. If you're connecting a device, turn it on, and then follow the instructions that appear on the device's screen. If you're connecting another computer, turn that computer on.

        For more information about adding a device or computer to your network, seeAdd a device or computer to a network.

      To turn on home media streaming

      If media sharing isn't already turned on, follow these steps:

      1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs, and then click Windows MediaPlayer.
        If the Player is currently open and you’re in Now Playing mode, click the Switch to Library button Picture of the Switch to Library button in the upper-right corner of the Player.
      2. Click Stream, and then click Turn on home media streaming.

        Turn on home media streaming won't be available on the Stream menu if streaming is already turned on.

      3. On the Media streaming options page, click Turn on media streamingAdministrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      4. Click OK.

      Notes

      Notes

      • If your computer is on a public network, you will be prompted to change the network location before you can stream media. For more information about network locations, see Choosing a network location.

      • If you have set up a homegroup, you might be prompted to share your media libraries with your homegroup before you can stream media. For more information about sharing libraries with a homegroup, see Share libraries with your homegroup.

      To set up basic streaming preferences

      After you turn on media streaming, Windows Media Player will automatically detect any computers and devices on your network that can receive media streams. You can stream media to all computers and devices on your network, or allow access to your media on a case-by-case basis. To choose which devices will receive your media streams, follow these steps:

      1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs, and then click Windows MediaPlayer.
        If the Player is currently open and you’re in Now Playing mode, click the Switch to Library button Picture of the Switch to Library button in the upper-right corner of the Player.
      2. Click Stream, and then click More streaming options.

        Picture of the Stream menuStream menu

        More streaming options won't appear on the Stream menu until after you turn on home media streaming.

      3. On the Media streaming options page, do one of the following:

        • If you want to stream media to all computers and devices on your network, click Allow All.

        • If you don't want to stream media to any computers or devices on your network, click Block All.

        • If you want to stream media to some computers and devices, click eitherAllowed or Blocked on the menu next to each item in the list of computers and devices.

      4. Click OK.

        For more information about media steaming settings, see Change settings for streaming media in Windows Media Player.

      To receive a media stream from another computer or device on your network

      You can use Windows Media Player to receive a media stream from another computer or media device on your network so that you can play it on your computer. To do this, follow these steps:

      1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs, and then click Windows MediaPlayer.
        If the Player is currently open and you’re in Now Playing mode, click the Switch to Library button Picture of the Switch to Library button in the upper-right corner of the Player.
      2. Click another computer's Player Library on your network listed under Other Libraries in the navigation pane.

        If you don't see Other Libraries in the navigation pane, then do the following:

        1. Click Organize, and then click Customize navigation pane.

        2. At the top of the Customize Navigation Pane dialog box, click the name of the Library in the drop-down list, and then click Other Libraries.

        3. Select the Show Other Libraries check box, and then click OK.

      3. Find an item you want to play in the details pane, and then double-click it.

      To stream media to another computer or device using Play To

      You can use Windows Media Player to stream media, or play to, another computer or media device on your network.

      Picture of the Play To dialog boxPlay To dialog box

      For example, if you have a digital media receiver connected to your home network,Windows will automatically detect it and allow you to play music on it using Windows Media Player. To play to another computer or device, follow these steps:

      1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs, and then click Windows MediaPlayer.
        If the Player is currently open and you’re in Now Playing mode, click the Switch to Library button Picture of the Switch to Library button in the upper-right corner of the Player.
      2. If the list pane is closed or if the Burn or Sync tabs are exposed, click the Playtab.

      3. Find the items that you want to play in the Player Library, and then drag those items from the details pane into the list pane.

      4. Click the Play to buttonPicture of the Play to button at the top of the list pane, click the device on your network that will receive the media.
      5. In the Play To dialog box, use the playback controls to play, pause, or stop the media stream, and to change to the next or previous item in the list.

        For more information about the Play tab, the list pane, and playback controls, seeGetting started with Windows Media Player. For more information about Play To, see Using the Play To feature to stream media.

      Note

      Note

      When you stream music to a digital media receiver, you might not be able to switch tracks using controls on the device itself or the remote control that came with the device.


    • View More: Pictures and music Stream your media to devices and computers using Windows Media Player
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  • Photo Gallery: Organize, edit, and share photos

    • Windows Live Photo Gallery makes it easy to organize your photos, edit them so they look their best, and share them online. Now Photo Gallery supports many RAW formats so you can import and work with these files directly from your camera.

      Organize photos and videos in Photo Gallery

      Photo Gallery has tools to locate and organize the photos and videos by the information your camera adds—like the date a photo was taken—or by information you add—like tags, captions, and other information.

      To search your photos and videos, select the folders you'd like to search from the navigation pane and then, on the Find tab, choose the information you want to search for.

      Edit photos

      Photo Gallery has editing tools to improve the appearance of your photos by changing their alignment, exposure, color settings, and more. With Photo Gallery, you can remove red eye, retouch photos, and even add creative color and tonal effects to photos.

      To make automatic adjustments to a photo, double-click a photo, and then, in the Adjustments group, clickAuto adjust.
      Picture of automatic editing features in Photo GalleryAutomatically edit photos with Photo Gallery.

      You can also automatically edit a batch of photos. Select the photos you want to edit, and then, on the Edittab, select the adjustments you want to make from the Quick adjustments group.

      For precise editing control, double-click a photo, and then, in the Adjustments group, click Fine tune. Select an adjustment and move the corresponding slider. Click Close file to automatically save your changes and return to the gallery.
      Picture of fine-tune sliders in Photo GalleryUse the fine-tune sliders for precise editing control.

      Upload photos and videos to social networking sites

      You can upload photos and videos to your favorite social networking sites like Facebook or YouTube. Select the photos and videos you want to upload. On the Home tab, in the Share group, select a publishing destination, and then follow the on-screen instructions.

      To add another publishing destination to the Share gallery, click Add a plug-in, and then follow the on-screen instructions.


    • View More: Pictures and music Photo Gallery: Organize, edit, and share photos
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  • Burn a CD or DVD in Windows Media Player

    • You can use Windows Media Player to copy music, pictures, and videos on your computer to a blank CD or DVD. This process is called burning.

      Picture of Windows Media PlayerBurning a CD in Windows Media Player

      There are many reasons why you might want to use the Player to burn media files to a disc. For example, if you're planning a long road trip, you might want to select a mix of songs from the Player Library and burn them to audio CDs you can play in your car. The songs you choose might be favorites that you ripped from your CD collection or songs you purchased from an online store.

      For more information about the Player Library, see Getting started with Windows Media Player.

      The following sections describe the types of discs you can create in the Player, the equipment and materials you'll need, and step-by-step instructions for burning different kinds of discs.

      Hide all

      Types of discs you can burn

      Windows Media Player gives you the option of burning three kinds of discs: audio CDs, data CDs, and data DVDs. The type of disc you can use depends on what you want to copy (for example, whether it's only music or a combination of music, videos, and pictures), how much material you want to copy (for example, a single album or dozens of albums), and what type of device you want to use to play the disc (for example, a computer or a car CD player).

      Disc typeDescription

      Audio CD

      This is ideal for making custom music CDs that you can play using any car or home stereo.

      • Content: Music only

      • Capacity: Up to 80 minutes

      • Playback devices: Almost any CD player, including those found in home stereos, car stereos, and computers.

      Data CD

      This is a great option if you have lots of music and a car CD player that can play Windows Media Audio (WMA) files (the type of music file that most people have in their Player Library). It's also handy for backing up your media files.

      • Content: Music, pictures, and videos

      • Capacity: About 700 megabytes (MB), or roughly 8 hours of music

      • Playback devices: Computers and some CD and DVD players. The device must support the file types that you add to the disc, such as WMA, MP3, JPEG, or Windows Media Video (WMV).

      Data DVD

      Because of its larger capacity, this type of disc is used for all the same reasons you would use a data CD, but especially if you have a larger volume of files that won't fit on a single data CD.

      • Content: Music, pictures, and videos

      • Capacity: About 4.7 gigabytes (GB), or roughly 54 hours of music

      • Playback devices: Computers and some DVD players. The device must support the file types that you add to the disc, such as WMA, MP3, JPEG, or WMV.

      What you'll need

      To get started, you'll need the following:

      • A CD or DVD recorder drive (also known as a CD or DVD burner).

        Almost all recent computers include a CD burner that lets you burn audio and data CDs. Some computers include a combination CD/DVD burner that lets you burn audio CDs, data CDs, and data DVDs.

        If you don't know what kind of burner you have, check the documentation that came with your computer.

      • A blank CD or DVD.

        The type of blank disc you need depends on what kind of burner you have and what kind of disc you're trying to make.

        For audio CDs, your best bet is the CD-R format because it's relatively inexpensive and it's compatible with the widest range of playback devices.

        For data CDs, CD-R is sufficient for most people's needs. However, if you want the ability to erase the disc later and add new files to it, choose CD-RW. Just keep in mind that blank CD-RW discs are typically more expensive than blank CD-R discs, and not all CD players can play CD-RW discs.

        For data DVDs, choose DVD-R or DVD+R if you only need to add files to the disc once. Choose DVD-RW or DVD+RW if you want the ability to erase the disc later and add new files to it. Note that some DVD burners support all of these blank disc types and some only support certain ones. For more information, see the documentation that came with your computer.

      Watch this video to learn how to burn a CD or DVD (2:07)

    • View More: Pictures and music Burn a CD or DVD in Windows Media Player
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  • Optimize Windows Vista for better performance

    • No matter how fast or shiny computers might be when they are new, they all seem to get slower over time. That state-of-the-art PC you bought last year might not feel like such a screamer after you install a dozen programs, load it with antispyware and antivirus tools, and download untold amounts of junk from the Internet. The slowdown might happen so gradually you hardly notice it, until one day you’re trying to open a program or file and wonder, "What happened to my poor PC?"

      Whatever the cause, there are a lot of ways to help speed up Windows and make your PC work better—even without upgrading your hardware. Here are some tips to help you optimize Windows Vista for faster performance


    • View More: Performance and Maintenance Optimize Windows Vista for better performance
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  • Update a driver for hardware that isn't working properly

    • If you have a hardware device that isn't functioning properly, or you're installing a program or game that states it requires newer drivers than you currently have installed, you should check Windows Update for updated drivers. You might also want to setWindows Update to check automatically for recommended driver updates.

      A third option is to manually update drivers for a device.

      Hide all

      To update drivers using Windows Update

      You can check Windows Update anytime to see if it has found new drivers for your hardware. Then, you can install them if you choose. Here's how:

      1. Open Windows Update by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking All Programs, and then clicking Windows Update.‌ Administrator permission required If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      2. In the left pane, click Check for updates.

      3. To see if updated drivers are available, click View available updatesWindowsUpdate will list any updated drivers that are available for devices installed in your computer.

      4. If updates are available, click the driver that you want to install, and then clickInstallAdministrator permission required If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      To set Windows to check for recommended updates

      Even if you have Windows Update set to automatically install important updates for your computer, it still might not be set to install all the updated drivers it finds for your hardware, since not all these are classified as important. To get all the driver updates, you'll need to turn on recommended updates. Here's how to set Windows to do this:

      1. Open Windows Update by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking All Programs, and then clicking Windows Update.
      2. In the left pane, click Change settings.

      3. Click Install updates automatically (recommended).

      4. Under Recommended updates, select the check box for Include recommended updates when downloading, installing, or notifying me about updates, and then click OKAdministrator permission required If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

        Picture of options for choosing how Windows installs updatesTo make sure you get the latest drivers for your hardware, set Windows to automatically download recommended updates

      To manually update drivers

      It's best to let Windows install drivers for your hardware automatically. You should avoid manually updating a driver unless Windows is unable to find a driver for one of your devices but you were able to obtain one some other way, or if technical support personnel ask you to install drivers from a disc or from the device manufacturer's website. If you decide to manually update a driver, here's how:

      You must be logged on as an administrator to perform these steps.

      1. Open Device Manager by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Maintenance, and then clicking Device Manager.‌ Administrator permission required If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

      2. In Device Manager, locate the device you want to update, and then double-click the device name.

      3. Click the Driver tab, and then click Update Driver and follow the instructions.

      Note

      Note

      • Printer information is not included in Device Manager. You can check if a printer is installed or manually update printer drivers by opening Printers in Control Panel. For more information, see Add or remove a printer.

      • To find out if your hardware (or hardware you plan to buy) is compatible with Windows Vista, go online to the Windows VistaCompatibility Center. This website contains a comprehensive list of hardware components and devices that work with Windows Vista.


    • View More: Hardware and drivers Update a driver for hardware that isn't working properly
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  • Connect to a wireless network

    • If you have a portable computer or a desktop computer with a wireless network adapter, you can see a list of available wireless networks and then connect to one of those networks. The wireless networks will only appear if your computer has a wireless network adapter installed, the adapter is turned on, and the wireless access point is in range.

      To view and connect to wireless networks in Windows 7

      1. Click the wireless network icon Picture of the wireless network icon in the notification area of your taskbar.
      2. In the list of wireless networks, click the network you want to connect to, and then click Connect.

      3. If you're connecting to a secure network, type the security key, and then click OK.

      To view and connect to wireless networks in Windows Vista

      1. Open Connect to a Network by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button and then clicking Connect to.
      2. In the Show list, click Wireless.

      3. Click the network you want to connect to, and then click Connect.

      4. If you're connecting to a secure network, type the security key, and then click OK.

        If you don't see the network you want to connect to, click Set up a connection or network. A list of options will appear that includes manually searching for and connecting to a network, as well as creating a new network connection.

      To view and connect to wireless networks in Windows XP

      1. Click Start, click Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click Network Connections.

      2. In the left pane, under Network Tasks, click View available wireless networks.

        Note

        Note

        If you don't see the network you want to connect to, click Refresh network list.

      3. Click the network you want to connect to, and then click Connect.

      4. If you're connecting to a secure network, type the security key, and then click OK.

      Warning

      Warning

      Whenever possible, you should connect to security-enabled wireless networks. If you do connect to a network that's not secure, be aware that someone with the right tools can see everything that you do, including the websites you visit, the documents you work on, and the user names and passwords that you use. Changing your network location to Public can help minimize the risk. For more information, see Choosing a network location and How do I know if a wireless network is secure?

      Troubleshoot connection problems

      If you're having trouble connecting to a wireless network, review the sections below for troubleshooting tips.

      Hide all

      What if I don’t see my wireless network in the list of available networks?

      Your wireless router might not be set to broadcast its network ID (SSID). If this is the case you won’t see the network when viewing available networks. Enabling the router to broadcast its network ID makes the network visible to any user within range of the network.

      To check your wireless router and enable the option to broadcast the network ID (SSID), refer to the documentation that came with the wireless router or follow these basic steps:

      1. Connect your computer to the network using a network cable, start Internet Explorer, and type the IP address for your wireless router (for example, 192.168.1.1 or 172.16.0.0).

      2. Enter the user name and password to access the router settings. The documentation will contain the default user name and password.

      3. On the wireless router page, look for a Wireless Settings option. Depending on the router manufacturer, this might be a tab, an icon or just an option in a task pane.

      4. On the Wireless Settings page, look for an option to Enable SSID Broadcast or Wireless SSID Broadcast. Click the radio button or place a check in the box to enable this option, then save your router settings.

        Note

        Note

        If you can't find the option to enable broadcasting, check the documentation that came with the router or contact the router manufacturer.

      How do I connect to a hidden wireless network?

      A hidden wireless network is a wireless network that isn't broadcasting its network ID (SSID). For more information about the risks of connecting to hidden networks, see What are the risks of connecting to a hidden network?

      If you still want to connect to a hidden wireless network despite the risks, you'll need to gather some information from the wireless router first. Use the following basic steps to gather that information. You can also check the documentation that came with the wireless router or contact the router manufacturer.

      1. Gather the following information:

        • Network ID (SSID), the name that would normally appear in the list of available networks

        • Security type (WPA, WPA2, WEP, or 802.1X)

        • Encryption type

        • Security key

      2. Then follow the steps below for the operating system you are using.

      Show all

      My wireless connection is not connected when my computer resumes from sleep or hibernation.

      When coming out of sleep or hibernation, your wireless network connection might not reconnect if the power options on your wireless adapter are set to a power-saving mode. To check or change your current power options, follow the steps below for your operating system:

      Windows 7

      1. Open Power Options by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Security, and then clicking Power Options.
      2. Next to your currently selected power plan, click Change plan settings, and then click Change advanced power settings.

      3. Click to expand the Wireless Adapter Settings section, and then click to expand the Power Saving Mode section.

      4. If the setting is currently anything other than "Maximum Performance," click it and then selectMaximum Performance.

      Note

      Note

      You can also set the On battery setting to "Maximum Performance." For more information on power management, see the Power managementfeature page on the Microsoft website.

      Windows Vista

      1. Open Power Options by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Maintenance, and then clicking Power Options.
      2. Next to your currently selected power plan, click Change plan settings, and then click Change advanced power settings.

      3. Click to expand the Wireless Adapter Settings section, and then click to expand the Power Saving Mode section.

      4. If the setting is currently anything other than "Maximum Performance," click it and then selectMaximum Performance.

      Note

      Note

      You can also set the On battery setting to "Maximum Performance." For more information on power management, see What's new in managing power settings.

      Windows XP

      1. Click Start, click Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click Network Connections.

      2. Right-click the wireless network connection that has lost connectivity, and then click Properties.

      3. On the General tab, click Configure.

      4. Click the Advanced tab, click Power Save Mode. If the setting in the Value list is currently anything other than "Off," change it to Off.

      Where can I find my network security key?

      You can find your security key by opening the wireless router's settings webpage. This is where the security key is set up or automatically generated. Some wireless router manufacturers set a default security key that you might be able to find on a sticker in the documentation or on the bottom of the router. If you don't find the security key in the documentation or on the bottom of the router, follow these steps:

      1. Connect your computer to the router using an Ethernet cable.

      2. Start a web browser and type the IP address for your wireless router into the search bar (for example, 192.168.1.1 or 172.16.0.0). You can find the default IP address in the documentation that came with your router.

      3. Most router documentation contains a default user name and password to access the router settings webpage.

      4. On the router settings webpage, look for a wireless or wireless settings option. Depending on the router manufacturer, this might be a tab, an icon, or an option in a task pane.

      5. On the wireless settings page, look for a security or wireless encryption option.

      6. You might see a security type or encryption type setting. The security key is listed by the selected security type.

      Note

      Note

      Different router manufacturers have different settings pages. If you’re having difficulty accessing the router settings, contact the router manufacturer.


    • View More: Networking and Mail Connect to a wireless network
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  • Microsoft Windows Locks Up, Hangs Unexpectedly or an Error Occurs

  • Computer Does Not Boot to Microsoft Windows Vista

  • Troubleshooting Error Messages on a Blue Screen that may Occur During Startup or Boot

    • There are many reasons that a computer does not startup or boot into the Windows operating system. If your computer will not start or boot, you will see or hear symptoms to indicate the general area of the problem. If you are not sure what the problem is, see Overview of How to Troubleshoot Problems When a Computer Does Not Start Up or Boot Properly .
      Startup Symptom: Computer displays a blue screen or continually re-starts
      Use this document if the LED lights glow or you hear the sound of a fan or hard drive spinning, and the HP or Compaq logo displays briefly, but then the notebook stops responding and displays a blue screen. In some cases, the computer may be operating in Windows but suddenly crash and stop responding. In most cases, an error message is displayed on the blue screen, the computer does not respond to commands typed on the keyboard, and it is necessary to press and hold the power button for 15 seconds or more, to turn off the computer.
      The most common cause of this problem is conflicting instructions from multiple programs or drivers. Installing a new program that is not compatible with the hardware or another program may cause a blue screen error.
      DO THIS FIRST - Perform a hard reset
      If a PC suddenly fails to boot properly, you should perform a hard reset as the first procedure.
      1. Disconnect all peripheral devices and remove all USB devices and media cards. You want to test the computer not the accessories!
      2. Disconnect the AC power adapter, remove the battery, and then press and hold the power button for at least 15 seconds .
      3. Reconnect the AC power adapter (but do not connect the battery), Press the Power button,Look for glowing LEDs near caps lock and num lock keys, and Listen for sounds of a disk drive and fan turning.
      Actions to take after performing hard reset


      Search Web for Specific Error Message
      When a computer freezes and displays a blue screen it also displays an error message, however, if the computer is set to automatically restart on an error condition, the message may be cleared off the screen before you can see it. If you are unable to view an error message or the Windows desktop, or if the computer tries to reboot automatically, you can disable the Windows automatic restart feature. This will enable you to view any specific error messages.
        1. Turn off the computer and wait 5 seconds.
        2. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f8 key to enter the Windows Advanced Options Menu.
        3. Use the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to select Disable automatic restart on system failure and then press the enter key.
        4. Press the enter key again to restart Windows.
        1. Click Start , right-click My Computer , and then click Properties .
        2. Click the Advanced tab.
        3. In the Startup and Recovery section, click Settings .
        4. Under System Failure , deselect the Automatically Restart check box.
        5. Click OK to close the Startup and Recovery window, and then click OK to close the System Properties window.
        6. Restart the computer.
      Automatic restart is now disabled. When you restart the computer, if a specific start up error message is displayed, search the following web sites for a specific solution:
      If the displayed error message does not appear in the list, search the following web sites for a specific solution:
      If there is no specific error message on the blue screen, there are several things you can do to troubleshoot possible causes. You must be able to access Safe Mode with Networking and have a broadband internet connection to perform the following steps.
      If none of the above solutions resolve your blue screen error, please search www.microsoft.com for information on resolving the error or contact HP for technical support .
      You can use Microsoft System Restore to reset the computer setting to a time prior to the occurrence of the blue screen error, called the "last known good configuration". There are three ways you can reset the computer to the last known good configuration:
        To select a restore point using f8 to boot into Safe Mode and run a Microsoft System Restore, follow the steps below.
        1. Turn off the computer and wait 5 seconds.
        2. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f8 key to enter the Windows Advanced Options Menu.
        3. Use theUp Arrow and Down Arrow keys to select Safe Mode , and then press enter .
        4. Wait while Windows files load.
        5. Login at the Windows login screen.
        6. After Windows starts, click Start , type restore into the search field, and then selectSystem Restore from the list to open System Restore.
        7. On the System Restore window, click Next , and then follow the on-screen instructions to select a restore point.
          Your computer will now start into Windows using the last settings at a time when the computer was working correctly, undoing any recent settings changes that may have caused the current problem.
        CAUTION:If you use HP Recovery Manager to perform a system restore, you cannot undo the restore.
        To select a restore point using HP Recovery Manager, follow the steps below:
        1. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f11 key to launch HP Recovery Manager.
        2. In the HP Recovery Manager window, click Advanced options , and then selectMicrosoft System Restore .
        3. Click Next , and then follow the on-screen instructions to select a restore point.
        Your computer will now start into Windows using the last settings at a time when the computer was working correctly, undoing any recent settings changes that may have caused the current problem.
        To select a restore point using the Last Known Good Configuration using Microsoft System Restore, follow the steps below:
        1. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f8 key to open the Advanced Boot Options window.
        2. Use the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to select Last Known Good Configuration (advanced) , and then press enter .
        Your computer will now start into Windows using the last settings at a time when the computer was working correctly, undoing any recent settings changes that may have caused the current problem.
      NOTE:Using a System Restore Point to go to the last known good configuration may cause you to have to reinstall any recently installed software, if the software was causing the problem.
      For more information about using a System Restore Point, please see HP Notebook PCs - Using Microsoft System Restore .
      Many computer problems are related to soft failures (or degraded performance) on the hard drive. The HP Hard Drive Self Test will repair soft errors on the hard drive, but it will not report the errors. After the test is complete, restart the computer to see if test repaired the problem you may been experiencing.
      Use the steps below to test the hard drive in a computer using the HP Hard Drive self test.
      1. Plug the AC Adapter into the computer.
      2. Turn off the computer and wait 5 seconds.
      3. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f10 key to enter the BIOS Setup menu.
      4. Use the Right Arrow or Left Arrow keys to navigate through the menu selection to locate thePrimary Hard Drive Self Test option. Depending on your BIOS, this may be located below either Diagnostics or Tools .
      5. Select Primary Hard Drive Self Test , and then press the Enter key to start the test.
        NOTE:The exact wording of the option for your particular BIOS may be slightly different.
      The Hard Drive Self Test performs a Quick Test followed by a Comprehensive Test . During each test, the window displays a status bar and an estimated time to completion. See HP Notebook PCs - Testing a Hard Disk using the Built in Self Test for additional information.
      • If any test fails , contact HP service and support for instructions on how to order a replacement hard drive.
      • If all of the tests pass, the hard drive is not damaged. As a rule, HP will not replace a hard drive under warranty that does not fail the HP Hard Drive Self Test.
      • If there is no physical problem with the hard drive or memory, then try reinstalling yourWindows operating system to troubleshoot the problem.
      To perform a memory self test, follow these steps:
      1. Plug the AC adapter into the computer.
      2. Turn off the computer and wait 5 seconds.
      3. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f10 key to enter the BIOS Setup menu.
      4. Use the Right Arrow or Left Arrow keys to navigate through the menu selection to locate theDiagnostics .
      5. Press Up Arrow or Down Arrow keys to select Memory Test .
      6. Press Enter , and then Yes to perform memory test.
      7. After test completes, press f10 to Save and Exit , and then press Enter to Exit Saving Changes? .
      If the test fails, one or more of the memory modules may not be seated properly. Check for and reseat loose memory modules.
      If computer does not boot into Windows, press the Power button to start the computer, and repeatedly press the f8 key. On the Advanced Boot Options screen, select one or more of the following options to resolve the startup problems. Select the options individually and press the enter key to restart the computer.
      • Select Disable automatic restart on system failure to view error messages.
      • Select Last Known Good Configuration (Advanced) to return settings to an earlier point in time.
      A blue screen error may occur after installing a software program that is not compatible or conflicts with an existing program. You can clear the blue screen error by uninstalling the program in the Safe Mode. You may also go to program manufacturer's web site and look for support information.
      To uninstall the application in Safe Mode, do the following steps.
      1. Turn off the computer and wait 5 seconds.
      2. Press the Power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the f8 key to enter the Windows Advanced Options Menu.
      3. Use the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to select Safe Mode from the Advanced Boot Options menu and then press enter .
      4. When Windows starts in the Safe Mode, click Start , Control Panel , and then select Add or Remove Programs .
      5. Select the application or program from the list that was most recently installed.
      6. Click Change/Remove and follow the on-screen instructions to uninstall the application.
      7. Once you have uninstalled the recently added program in Safe Mode, click Start , and thenShut Down to restart your computer.
        1. If the computer starts up normally to the Windows desktop, no further action is necessary.
        2. If the notebook continues to stop responding at the Windows splash screen, continue troubleshooting by proceeding to the next process.
      For more information about uninstalling software programs, please see HP Notebook PCs - Uninstalling Software in Windows Vista .
      A blue screen error may occur if the BIOS or a device driver is out of date or is not compatible with some other hardware or software component. Try updating the BIOS and device drivers to resolve the problem. To locate a BIOS or updated device drivers for your computer, follow the steps below:
      1. Go to the hp.com web site. Click Support and Drivers , select the Download drivers and software (and firmware) option, and then enter the model number in the Enter a product name / number field.
      2. Click Go to start the search, and then select the operating system that is installed on the computer.
      For more information about updating the BIOS and device drivers, please see HP Notebook PCs - Using HP Update Tools to Update HP Software, Drivers, and BIOS .
      Sometimes a blue screen error occurs because you do not have the latest updates for Windows. Microsoft may have an update for Windows to resolve the blue screen error. Be sure to install all of the latest Windows updates. For more information about using Windows Update, please see HP Notebook PCs - Using Windows Update Program to Update Microsoft Software in Vista .
      • In XP, click Start , then Control Panel , and then select Windows Update in the left panel.
      • In Vista, click Start , type system into the search field, select System from the list, and then select Windows Update in the left panel.
      If none of the above actions has resolved this condition, you may have a corrupted operating system. Therefore, you need to reinstall the Windows operating system on the notebook. See HP Notebook PCs - Repairing or Reinstalling The Operating System for additional information.
      If none of the above steps has resolved the issue, please contact HP for help.
      To contact HP for support or technical assistance, click the Contact HP link near the upper left corner of this web page, or go to Hewlett Packard Technical Support web page at www.hp.com/support , select a Country or Region, a Language, and then click Contact HP .
      After you have completed the troubleshooting process and your computer has booted normally into the Windows operating system, you should:
      • Run HP Assistant to update HP software and drivers.
      • Run Windows Update to update operating system and software.
      • Run anti-virus program to remove any virus.
      For detailed information on this topic, see HP Notebook PCs - Update Your Computer After Troubleshooting a Problem .

    • View More: HP Troubleshooting Error Messages on a Blue Screen that may Occur During Startup or Boot
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  • Windows Update error 0x8007066A or 66A

  • Information regarding End of Support for Windows Vista Service Pack 1 (SP1)

  • Where can I find Personalized Training on Windows 7?

  • How to change system language of Windows 7 Home Premium from russian to english?

    • Question

      How to change system language of Windows 7 Home Premium from russian to english?

      How to change system language of Windows 7 Home Premium from russian to english?
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      17 People had
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      You will need to upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate for this capability. Only Windows 7 Ultimate includes Multilingual User Interface (Language Pack) support. You can then install the English Language Pack from under Regional and Language settings in Control Panel. 

      You can do an Anytime Upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate which will preserve your personal files and settings:

      Learn more: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/windows-anytime-upgrade
      Andre Da Costa http://adacosta.spaces.live.com http://www.activewin.com
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      Andre Da Costa

      Andre Da Costa
      http://techingiteasy.wordpress.co

    • View More: Installation and Upgrade How to change system language of Windows 7 Home Premium from russian to english?
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  • Windows 7 - Upgrade Unsuccessful -Reboot Loop

    • Question

      Windows 7 - Upgrade Unsuccessful -Reboot Loop

      Hello, I purchased Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit. I am attempting to upgrade from Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit. On the last step of the upgrade (transferring files/programs/etc), my laptop rebooted and came to a screen telling me the upgrade was unsuccessful and my previous OS files would now be restored. My laptop is now in what seems to be a loop of restarting and trying to restore the files. 

      Each copy of Windows I have are genuine (not pirated or anything), and I ran the Windows 7 Upgrade Compatibility Advisor and received no warnings from it before attempting to upgrade. My laptop meets the minimum requirements for upgrade. 

      Please help me out.
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      160 People had
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       In reply to deleted message

      Hello,

      We have identified a resoltion for some of these reboot loops.  Please see the steps below for details:

      We will start by booting into Windows Recovery Environment using the same steps above.  I will list them again here for completion's sake:

      1.    boot using the Windows 7 installation DVD
      2.    Choose your language settings and hit "Next"
      3.    Click on "Repair Your Computer" link at the bottom of the screen. This will launch Windows RE.

      NOTE: Do not click on “Install Now”

      4.    Choose the OS to repair, and take note of the Drive Letter assigned to the operating System.
      5.    You should see “Windows 7” and D:\ (the drive letter may be different)
      6.    Click Next and you should see a list of the recovery tools
      7.    Click on “Command Prompt”
      8.    You will see “X:\Sources” in white on a black background, you can type commands here

      Once you have booted into WinRE please follow the steps below:

      1. Type "cd c:\users" at the command prompt. 
      2. Type "dir /s /p", and look for the words "is too long".  
      3. If you don't see "is too long" on the first page, press a key to get the next page 
      4. Look on the second page for "is too long".
      5. Continue to press a key to advance in pages until you find all the strings "is too long". (This may take quite a few pages to get to the end)

      NOTE: You may see more than 1 entry that has "is too long", please take a note of each entry as we will need the folder names in later steps.

      Once you have identified all the folders with "is too long" we will need to move them into a temp location.

      7. Type "move" followed by the path of the folder, then the name of the temporary location to move to:

      EXAMPLE:  MOVE C:\USERS\BOB\DOCUMENTS\DOCUMENTS C:\TEMP

      8. Once all the invalid folders have been moved, repeat step 1 and 2 to verify that there are no other folders with "is too long"
      9. Once completed, restart the computer and you should be able to successfully boot into Vista.

      10. Once back into a working Vista, open "Computer" and navigate to C:\Users and open your username folder.
      11. Right click on each folder one by one and choose "Properties".
      12. Click on the Location tab and confirm that the path shown is correctly displaying the path for this folder.

      Example: The properties / location of C:\Users\BOB\Documents should have the same correct path listed on the location tab "C:\Users\BOB\Documents". 

      13. If any folder's location is not correct, click on "Restore Defaults" and repeat
      14. Once all the folders have been corrected, please reboot the computer and retry the upgrade process again.

      I have unlocked this thread, please let me know if you see success with the above steps.

      Thanks!


      If you find that my answer was what you were looking for, please remember to click the "mark as answer" box below!
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  • Can I install windows 7 on more than one computer?

    • Question

      Can I install windows 7 on more than one computer?

      I love this OS and would like to install on all of my computers (many).
      Can I use same serial number for ultiple computers?
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      Hello owonhee,

      Thank you for using Microsoft Answers forum.  Your product key will work for up to three separate computers, so if you want to install the the RC on another PC, you can re-use the same key.


      Thanks for using the Answers Forum. Please let us know how this works out. 



      Joseph 
      Microsoft Answers Support Engineer 
      Visit our Microsoft Answers Feedback Forum and let us know what you think.
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    • View More: Installation and Upgrade Can I install windows 7 on more than one computer?
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  • I can't access Windows Update using Windows XP SP3

    • Question

      I can't access Windows Update using Windows XP SP3

      Applies To: Windows | Windows 7 | Windows Update

      Hello,

       

      I installed Windows XP SP3 and I can no longer access Windows Update. Is this a known issue? How can I fix this so that I can check for updates?

       

      Thanks

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      19 People had
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      Hello LD,

       

      This issue can happen if you install the Windows XP SP3 update on a computer that has older versions of some Windows Update files. To fix this issue you need to update those older Windows Update files. The steps to do this are fairly simple, just click the link to the KB article below to see how to do this:

       

      http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2497281

      (You may be unable to access the Windows Update website from Windows XP, Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 if those versions of Windows are not updated to the latest Service Pack)

      Thanks

      Bobby

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  • Windows Update page failed to load

    • Question

      Windows Update page failed to load

      Applies To: Windows | Windows Vista | Windows Update
      My Vista Home Premium Windows Update isn't working.  When I click on the Windows Update the error I get is "page fail to load."  Don't know what else I can do.  I tried the fix it link I found in one of the forums and that did not fix the problem.  What else can I check to get this fixed.  I am currently at Service Pack 1.   
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      There is a update for windows blinds on impulse just updated and every thing is back to normal
      Updating Windows Blinds solved the problem.  Couldn't any info as to what caused it.  Can't remember when I last updated that program, but I know I've updated Defender a lot and this problem appeared right after the last update I did a week ago.  Good to know for the future though.
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  • Windows 7 - Error Code: 66a (Can't install KB2160841)

    • Question

      Windows 7 - Error Code: 66a (Can't install KB2160841)

      Applies To: Windows | Windows 7 | Windows Update

      Getting error code 66A Windows update encountered an unknown error. Security Update for .NET Framework 4 on Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2 for x64-based Systems (KB2160841)

      Installation date: ‎10/‎17/‎2010 2:14 PM

      Installation status: Failed

      Error details: Code 66A

      Update type: Important

      A security issue has been identified that could allow an attacker to compromise your Windows-based system that is running the Microsoft .NET Framework and gain complete control over it. You can help protect your computer by installing this update from Microsoft. After you install this item, you may have to restart your computer.

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      had same problem,for a week,go to control panel click uninstall programs,find >Net framework 4 client profile file ,then click right and do repair file ,install part worked fine right after
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  • Windows 7 - Unidentified Network No Internet Access - Despair!

    • Question

      Windows 7 - Unidentified Network No Internet Access - Despair!

      I have a new Packard Bell PC with Windows 7 preinstalled.  I have had the tower replaced once, as it was suspected that the issue was caused by a fault with the wireless card.

      I initially connected to the internet - albeit slowly and briefly.  It shows that it is connected with my network but whatever I try I have Unidentified Network and No Internet Access showing

      I can connect through a 3mobile dongle.  Just not via the wireless card.

      I have looked at so many suggested fixes, and have tried as many as I am able, but I am so lost as to what to try next.

      Any suggestions?

      At the moment I am wishing I had stuck with my 8 year old PC - it may have been slow but it connected!

      Many thanks
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      Try disabling the McAfee network agent service. Run > "msconfig" > Services. I disabled the mcafee network agent and the mcafee firewall core service. 

      This solution fixed it for me!

      3 month old Dell laptop, preinstalled with McAfee trial suddenly had this "Unidentified Network no internet access". Thanks to this forum for the solution.

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      Answer

      Hi,  

       

      Welcome to Microsoft Windows 7 Answers Forum!

        
      To troubleshoot your issue you may try the below methods one by one.
       
      Method 1: Update the network driver.

      Steps to update network driver:

      1.    Click on start button. 
      2.    In the search box type devmgmt.msc and then press enter.
      3.    Select the network card device and right click on it
      4.    Now select properties.
      5.    In the properties window, under Driver tab, click on Update Driver button.
      6.    After the installing the updates restart the computer.

      For more information visit: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Update-a-driver-for-hardware-that-isnt-working-properly 

      Method 2: Try resetting the TCP/IP stack.
       
      To reset the TCP/IP stack go to this article and either click on "Fix it for me" or follow the instructions to fix it yourself: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357 .

      If still the same problem persists then try the next method.

      Method 3: 
      Here you need to troubleshoot using the Network troubleshooter in Windows 7 and check for the issue to do that follow the below provided link.

       

      http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Using-the-Network-troubleshooter-in-Windows-7


      Hope this helped

      Thanks and Regards:

      Suresh Kumar- Microsoft Support.

      Visit our Microsoft Answers Feedback Forum and let us know what you think.

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  • Windows 7 wireless connection problem - No Wireless Connections Available

    • Question